A Newcomer’s Guide to La Nouvelle Vague: Issue #5

A Newcomer’s Guide to La Nouvelle Vague: Issue #5

Voilà, welcome to issue number five of A Newcomer’s Guide to La Nouvelle Vague! As we move towards the end of this series on the French New Wave cinema, we will discuss films from directors Truffaut, Luc-Godard, and Resnais, with each film vastly different from the others.

Jules and Jim

Jules and Jim

Francois Truffaut’s 1962 film, Jules and Jim, centers around a pair of best friends named – you guessed it – Jules (Oskar Werner) and Jim (Henri Serre). The pair both fall for a woman named Catherine, but their relationship proves far more complicated than it appears. With a heartbreaking ending, this film presents life and love realistically; not everything is sunshine and rainbows, not even love.

Muriel, or The Time of Return

Muriel, or The Time of Return

Muriel, or The Time of Return, directed by Alain Resnais in 1963, is the follow up to Last Year at Marienbad (1961). Both films discuss the nature of time and how memories can truly haunt you forever. Near the end of this review, we also dive into Resnais’ past and personal style in filmmaking, including very specific editing and shooting styles.

Weekend

Weekend

Jean Luc-Godard’s 1967 film, Weekend, presents destruction, politics, hatred, and separation combined with strange experiences throughout the film that constantly tear apart the film’s reality. The film continuously leads us to believe one thing through the use of intertitles, fast cuts, and setting up our expectations, but ultimately proves there is no guarantee of what’s to come next. 

Trigger warning: The film contains disturbing images and utilizes a decent amount of fake blood and profanity that may be offensive.

Playtime

Playtime

Jacques Tati’s 1967 film Playtime is a vibrant, visual masterpiece, portraying how it feels to fall behind in a once-familiar city that now feels foreign due to advancing modernity. In our current modern world full of constant technological “upgrades” and advances, this film provides an interesting take on technological advancement affecting daily life. Tati also manages to kill two birds with one stone by directing and acting in Playtime, playing a character named Monsieur Hulot.

Little Women (2019): An Adaptation Done Right

Little Women (2019): An Adaptation Done Right

Director Greta Gerwig’s 2019 Little Women film adaptation is an example of reimagined classic stories done justice – plus, a truly rockstar cast, including Timothée Chalamet, Saoirse Ronan, Emma Watson, and many more familiar faces. Here on POV, we dive into what Gerwig’s Little Women got so right.

Brooklyn (2015): Home is Where Your Heart is

Brooklyn (2015): Home is Where Your Heart is

Brooklyn (2015), based on a novel by Colm Tóibín also titled Brooklyn, is about an Irish girl named Eilis, played by Saoirse Ronan. Ronan’s character travels from Ireland to New York during the 1950s, a time where Irish migration to New York was blooming. Director John Crowley’s take on the film captures the author’s delicate conversations and the actress’ and actors’ performances, creating a rich, romantic period drama that follows not only Eilis’ story, but her heart.

Enola Holmes (2020)

Enola Holmes (2020)

A look at Netflix’s latest play at a “mystery” movie, Enola Holmes (2020) stars Millie Bobby Brown as it’s lead with other notable cast members, but that may be its most memorable takeaway.

The Devil All the Time (2020): A Star-Studded Psychological Crime Melodrama

The Devil All the Time (2020): A Star-Studded Psychological Crime Melodrama

Based on a novel of the same title by Donald Ray Pollock, The Devil All the Time (2020) directed by Antonio Campus, is the thriller film we have been waiting for this year. Based in rural America, starting from the end of World War II, the film touches on many difficult topics such as suicide, gender oppression, cancer, sexual assault, and toxic religion, starring Tom Holland and Robert Pattinson.

Plein Soleil/Purple Noon

Plein Soleil/Purple Noon

In the 1960’s film Plein Soleil, or in English Purple Noon, directed by René Clément, there is scandal, love, jealousy, and an elaborate murder plan, all presented beautifully in vibrant color. You won’t want to miss a single second, between the close calls and Alain Delon’s stand-out features, there’s so much that the film has to offer.

Working with the Pros in Film 490

Film Studies majors Joe Eichele and Brynn Artley start off the Fall 2020 semester with a report from their documentary production class where students are working with Ambient House Productions.

Mulan (2020): A Reimagined Legend

Mulan (2020): A Reimagined Legend

The premiere of the highly anticipated Disney live-action, Mulan (2020), is now in the midst of major controversy after falling flat on several different aspects in the eyes of both the public and critics.

Review: Hustlers (Lorene Scafaria, 2019)

Review: Hustlers (Lorene Scafaria, 2019)

Lorene Scafaria’s Hustlers (2019) brings together a great team of A-List talents, but ultimately, leaves a lot to be desired both its ideological message and its cinematography. In the end, the only thing Hustlers will be hustling is your time and money.

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